Author

Alyson Emrick

Date of Award

2006

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts

Department

Leadership Studies

Abstract

Included in this paper are two studies, a survey study, and a vignette study. The survey research, Study 1, examined the effects of single-sex student leadership positions on leadership style used, perceptions of effective leadership, leadership self-efficacy, domain identification, and intent to lead in the future. It compared a group of male and female leaders of single-sex organizations, a group of men and women holding leadership positions in coeducational groups, and a group of male and female non-leaders. Male and female leaders reported using different leadership styles; men reported higher levels of the autocratic-task style while women reported higher levels of the democratic-relationship style. They also reported having perceptions of effective leadership that closely correlated with the leadership style used. Leaders reported higher levels of self-efficacy, domain identification, and intent to lead in the future than non-leaders. The vignette study, Study 2, examined the effects of leader's sex, leadership style, and group composition on the perceptions and evaluations of leaders. Contrasting previous literature, female leaders in the vignette study were rated more positively than male leaders.

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