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Abstract

This article argues that the local emphasis of what I call micromovements that form the larger Environmental Justice Movement could gain more traction from relationships with Non-Governmental Organizations. Such partnerships are emerging on a national level; however, since the localized movements communicate with, but are not partners with, national organizations such as the National Black Environmental Network, it is unclear how such partnerships add value to the activities of local groups. Moreover, some partnerships are forged for the organization of a specific event such as a conference or working group study Part II of this article discusses an overview of the history of the Environmental Justice Movement and legal remedies available for environmental justice claims. Part III addresses the partnerships between nongovernmental organizations and grassroots movements focusing specifically on one community's struggle with Velsicol Chemical Corporation. Finally, Part VI discusses the obstacles grassroots movement leaders face in trying to change policy and protect their community and how NGOs can be helpful to these efforts.