Document Type

Poster Session

Location

Jepson School of Leadership Studies, University of Richmond

Event Website

http://jepson.richmond.edu/research/symposium/index.html

Start Date

21-4-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

21-4-2017 12:00 PM

Description

This study uses historical comparisons of Joseph Stalin and Benito Mussolini to better understand the factors that contribute to leader emergence. Leader effectiveness is not evaluated in this study. The focus of these historical inquires is early ascensions to power during the early to mid-1920s. The factors that contribute to leader emergence can be divided into the categories of 1. individual traits and skills and 2. social, cultural, and political contexts of the follower base. The conclusion of these historical analyses is that leader emergence is facilitated as an interaction between historical contexts and the traits and skills of the leader. Sole emphasis on individual leadership abilities is inadequate to explain leader emergence. This finding provides the theoretical justification for the further integration of historical inquiry along with psychological studies in the field of leadership emergence.

Comments

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Peter Kaufman, Professor, George Matthews & Virginia Brinkley Modlin Chair in Leadership Studies

Hughes_Summer Research Paper.docx (140 kB)
Research Paper: The Rise of Stalin and Mussolini: The Importance of Historical Context in the Study of Leader Emergence

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Apr 21st, 10:30 AM Apr 21st, 12:00 PM

The Rise of Stalin and Mussolini: The Importance of Historical Context in the Study of Leader Emergence

Jepson School of Leadership Studies, University of Richmond

This study uses historical comparisons of Joseph Stalin and Benito Mussolini to better understand the factors that contribute to leader emergence. Leader effectiveness is not evaluated in this study. The focus of these historical inquires is early ascensions to power during the early to mid-1920s. The factors that contribute to leader emergence can be divided into the categories of 1. individual traits and skills and 2. social, cultural, and political contexts of the follower base. The conclusion of these historical analyses is that leader emergence is facilitated as an interaction between historical contexts and the traits and skills of the leader. Sole emphasis on individual leadership abilities is inadequate to explain leader emergence. This finding provides the theoretical justification for the further integration of historical inquiry along with psychological studies in the field of leadership emergence.

http://scholarship.richmond.edu/jepsonresearchsymposium/2017/program/1